British Problems. . Imoten IT' S (.' PIN@ Eil ite. They called it "soccer".
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#24 - allamericandude (10/21/2013) [+] (15 replies)
They called it "soccer".
User avatar #3 - blueturdi (10/21/2013) [+] (43 replies)
MILK?!
IN TEA?!
User avatar #4 to #3 - mymiddleleg ONLINE (10/21/2013) [-]
That's how it's suppose to be
#26 - paradoxrocks (10/21/2013) [+] (1 reply)
I believe that "British Problems" are referred to as "Britissues"
#116 - mojotion (10/22/2013) [+] (6 replies)
>Incorrect
>American
Clearly there's commie propaganda at play
#49 - MDrDeathC (10/22/2013) [+] (6 replies)
Realise vs. realize
Realise and realize are different spellings of the same word, and both are used to varying degrees throughout the English-speaking world. Realize is the preferred spelling in American and Canadian English, and realise is preferred outside North America. The spelling distinction extends to all derivatives of the verb, including realised/realized, realising/realizing, and realisation/realization.

Although realize is now regarded by many in the U.K. and Australasia as the American spelling, it is not an Americanism. In fact, the -ize spelling variant is older than -ise—realize predates the United States and Canada by nearly two centuries—and has been the preferred spelling throughout most of the word’s history in English. If we can believe the ngram below, which graphs the use of realize and realise in British books and journals published between 1800 and 2000, realise had a brief ascendancy in British English from the late 19th century through the early 20th, but realize was preferred before around 1875 and is again preferred today—perhaps because of the influence of dictionaries like Oxford, Cambridge, and Collins, which encourage -ize over -ise.

Suck crumpet.
User avatar #74 - ihatecarltonbanks (10/22/2013) [+] (1 reply)
Tried to be english.

Couldn't accept that there are other humans in the world who things differently and that that doesn't mean they are wrong.
#150 - trevanman (10/22/2013) [+] (15 replies)
you don't need milk in your tea.
just sugar
#163 to #150 - specialone (10/22/2013) [-]
How barbaric.
#256 - munyman (10/22/2013) [-]
English (Simplified)
#58 - Mixx (10/22/2013) [+] (7 replies)
I drink my tea WITHOUT ANY MILK!!! (:<
I drink my tea WITHOUT ANY MILK!!! (:<
#275 - hanabro (10/22/2013) [-]
Be British stoner.

Can't celebrate 4/20 because the date is wrong.
#50 - bitchesbanthymine (10/22/2013) [+] (6 replies)
Hey girl, why is my bed like an incorrect American spelling of words such as colour, honour, and flavour?





Because U should be there but you're not.
#97 - feelythefeel ONLINE (10/22/2013) [-]
**** pisses me off when I try to type colour.
#56 - aerious (10/22/2013) [+] (5 replies)
And for 			*****		 sake stop calling it soccer!
And for ***** sake stop calling it soccer!
User avatar #104 to #76 - aerious (10/22/2013) [-]
It's a quote from a movie, Green Street Hooligans. I have no problem with either way of saying it
#13 - anticitezenone ONLINE (10/21/2013) [+] (6 replies)
MFW I've been tricked my entire life into thinking "Aluminium" is spelled "Aluminum"
User avatar #23 - nanako ONLINE (10/21/2013) [+] (13 replies)
I so have to agree with that second one.

The language is called ENGLISH. it comes from ENGLAND. it should damn well have an english flag, really, but the union jack is fine too since it actually contains the english flag.

i'm actually scottish, but credit where it's due, come on guys :<
User avatar #244 - rifee (10/22/2013) [+] (9 replies)
Out of curiosity I'd like to aska few question (I'm neither english/american):

1. Why do you care that US citizens call football, soccer?
2. Is there any reason why the US didn't adopt the metric system?
3. Is drinking Tea more common than coffee in england, or are they kinda equal?
4. Apart from making it easier to say, why do so many people call themselves american instead of Us citizens?
5. Do you learn any second languages in England/USA, and if so are they mandatory?

Thanks in advance
#257 to #244 - eddymolly (10/22/2013) [-]
1) Just basically because over here in the UK we like to argue. Originally we called it soccer as well, then when the Americans did it, we changed to football (makes more sense to me personally as well, its a game where you kick a ball with your foot, but never mind that) just so we could be different.   
   
2) I think its because they want to argue as well. People generally say &quot;think how much it'll cost&quot; or something, but everyone who switched has paid the same for changing signs and stuff anyhow, as I said, I think its just because they don't want to change   
   
3) Tea is more popular. I think its somewhere around 1/3 coffee, 2/3 tea   
   
4) Probably because its easier to say. You kind of answered that one yourself. I don't think there really is any other reason.   
   
5) In England we tend to learn French or German in High school, sometimes spanish or something, but normally French or German. Its normally mandatory for a few years, but over here we have a thing where you learn some of everything for a few years at high school, then you choose specific subjects to focus on, and drop the rest (I don't know how many other countries do that, a lot i'd imagine) so its kind of mandatory for a while.    
   
   
   
Glad to help, have a gif to keep you entertained through this wall of text.
1) Just basically because over here in the UK we like to argue. Originally we called it soccer as well, then when the Americans did it, we changed to football (makes more sense to me personally as well, its a game where you kick a ball with your foot, but never mind that) just so we could be different.

2) I think its because they want to argue as well. People generally say "think how much it'll cost" or something, but everyone who switched has paid the same for changing signs and stuff anyhow, as I said, I think its just because they don't want to change

3) Tea is more popular. I think its somewhere around 1/3 coffee, 2/3 tea

4) Probably because its easier to say. You kind of answered that one yourself. I don't think there really is any other reason.

5) In England we tend to learn French or German in High school, sometimes spanish or something, but normally French or German. Its normally mandatory for a few years, but over here we have a thing where you learn some of everything for a few years at high school, then you choose specific subjects to focus on, and drop the rest (I don't know how many other countries do that, a lot i'd imagine) so its kind of mandatory for a while.



Glad to help, have a gif to keep you entertained through this wall of text.
User avatar #113 - giveupnow (10/22/2013) [+] (1 reply)
I am american but it really pisses me off when things have the us flag for the english language mainly because that is ******* retarded and entirely incorrect.
User avatar #188 to #113 - xgarthx (10/22/2013) [-]
Or maybe, just maybe, perhaps that it is talking about American English, you know in which things are spelled as they are in the American dictionary, or the American way. As you know America has invented words.
User avatar #112 - teleamachus (10/22/2013) [-]
<

American that spells 'realise'.
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