Boarding School. I remember my elementary school taking away our basketball courts, tetherball, and other things... It slowly became a borediing school. There i boarding School fun responsible no class dtrt
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Boarding School

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Boarding School. I remember my elementary school taking away our basketball courts, tetherball, and other things... It slowly became a borediing school. There i

I remember my elementary school taking away our basketball courts, tetherball, and other things... It slowly became a borediing school

There is a where all classes
are . If an
play all = every day.
blahb_
Arleta:
me in high Icyhot: . jets humans we hare a
natural thirst fur knowledge. While naturally kids did their own thing
for the first few weeks eventually eta raed wing ta ma M. l
want to go tn: class. ‘i-" ' re not learn and
because ifthat trhu want to learn.
THAT 5 B ROLLAND
...
+1777
Views: 59529 Submitted: 03/30/2014
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[ 204 comments ]
> hey anon, wanna give your opinion?
asd
#6 - pappathethird
Reply +252 123456789123345869
(03/30/2014) [-]
I'm stating that nords get paid to go to school
#118 to #6 - niggernazi
Reply -5 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
there is only one good country among these half assed nordick countries and its sweden
#131 to #118 - gerfox
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
Just going to leave this here
User avatar #133 to #131 - niggernazi
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
too bad its not your oil considering that you spend all the money from it too muslim immigrants
#134 to #133 - gerfox
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
Wrong. We put all the money we gain from oil in to the Pension Fund. We've done it since we first found oil, and have never used more than "Handlingsregelen" says - namely the interest of the fund overall. The Pension Fund today accounts for over half a million NOK (50k £) per inhabitant of Norway. We're saving all of our oil money for a rainy day, and it's our healthy economy who finances the muslim immigrants.
User avatar #135 to #134 - niggernazi
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
healthy economy my ass. if your economy was healthy you would have spend it on schools and roads instead of leeching on your big brother swedens roads
#137 to #135 - gerfox
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
Our economy is healthy as ****. We are one of the few countries in the world with NO public debt. Its quite the opposite actually, other countries owe US a lot instead. We're rich as ****, and even though the oil gave a lot of people jobs we've done an excellent job after WW2. We also have one of the highest BNPs per capita and we have the highest living standard.

Roads aren't everything - and I wish we'd build a lot of new roads. The thing is though that our infrastructure is decent - and improving the roads further, especially on the West Coast, would be extremely expensive due to how the nature is. Schools are free, students get paid - and our universities are well financed.
User avatar #141 to #137 - niggernazi
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
yeah but my bro told me that when he worked in norway he saw that the schools are completely crap. im not saying that swedish schools are any better considering that i went to a school for four years where the overall quality was crappy, trash everywhere and i could see the same stain of snus on the walls for months and no one cleaned it up exept the students at the end of each semester. the whole western economicy will fall within 30 years i tell ya hwat.
#142 to #141 - gerfox
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
Yeah, youre probably right about that - the lower schools are decent, but if you are talented you won't really get challenged. Some of the schools are old, and the buildings are not that great (the air is bad, and theres little isolation, meaning a cold winter), but when you reach higher education its usually pretty damn good in my opinion. Although we had cleaning ladies at our school who worked 8-16 every day, so it was pretty clean Of course, the quality is not the same as in the UK, France, Germany or the US, but we're just 5 millions people, and our education is free. If we want to we can even go abroad and the Norwegian state would even help pay for our education abroad.
User avatar #145 to #142 - niggernazi
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
pretty much the same here but everyone are wondering why the grades are decreasing while i just spend most of my schooltime on funnyjunk instead of doing any actual work. well except for now when i try to do a not worthless presentation of homosexuality, christianity and judaism
User avatar #79 to #6 - zombifier
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
I'm American and get paid to go to school too
User avatar #172 to #6 - starshroom
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
No, we get a LOAN, like nearly all universities offer, and some of it (about a third?) becomes a GRANT only if we PASS, and grants are also commonplace in other universities.
Source: I am Norwegian and have been "getting money for going to school" for five years here, I am $70,000 in debt because you have to pay back LOANS. I also went to an American university, where some of my classmen were given grants for their good grades (aka your free money).
User avatar #92 to #6 - snowshark
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
Well apparently in the UK they -want- to go to school.

Well... in that school at least.
User avatar #155 to #6 - finni
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
As far as I know, Norway don't pay students to go to University. They get money for the books and ****, but we don't really get paid to go there.
User avatar #156 to #155 - lightness
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
We do, you can apply for money from laanekassen if you need it. They will look at your parents situation and whatnot.

Source: I get paid 21 000 kroners (3512$) to go to school.
User avatar #158 to #156 - finni
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
That money isn't for you to go to school, but to get the money you need for school, books, trips, etc.

And I assume you only have one parent, or?
User avatar #159 to #158 - lightness
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
It pays for my lunch, and alchohol in the weekends, its far more than I need for school stuff, and besides, at my school we get books for free, only have to pay 900 kroner for your pc.
User avatar #160 to #159 - finni
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
Yeah, I know. The same goes for high school. You get more than you need. Again, do you have both parents living together?
User avatar #161 to #160 - lightness
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
Not living together no, so yeah, I get more because they're separeted. Which is kinda cool since it does not really make my situation worse.
User avatar #163 to #161 - finni
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
Guess that is one positive thing I get out of my parents getting a divorce.
User avatar #119 to #6 - voltkills
Reply +5 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
you just get given a small bit of the insane amount of tax you pay back.
#9 to #6 - andywazowski
Reply +17 123456789123345869
(03/30/2014) [-]
You didn't include perhaps THE greatest country ever. Pic super related.
#136 to #9 - niggernazi
Reply +11 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
User avatar #10 to #9 - pappathethird
Reply +9 123456789123345869
(03/30/2014) [-]
It's there. It's just a little small. (phrasing)

I should know, I'm from denmark
User avatar #117 to #10 - nastoy
Reply -5 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
Ehm.. no, that's not entire Denmark, that's Bornholm... dude..
#12 to #9 - earlploddington
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(03/30/2014) [-]
uh denmark sir we have your danegeld ready
#4 - include
Reply +147 123456789123345869
(03/30/2014) [-]
inb4 nords stating they get paid to go to school.
inb4 nords stating they get paid to go to school.
#36 to #4 - hazelnutqt
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
I ******* love the .gif and I'm not even Swedish...
#44 - DidYou
Reply +67 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
My parents, being hippies, decided I should try homeschooling for one year. While doing so, I met a lot of people who did  homeschooling and a lot of people who did "unschooling" where they were allowed complete control of their own education. One of the biggest things I noticed was that there was a huge disparity in maturity between them. While in public and private schools, you'll get your ass handed to you should you step too far out of line, creating a small standard deviation from an average level of maturity, the homeschoolers and unschoolers were all over the place, depending mostly on how involved their mothers were in their education.    
   
For example, I was taking a physics class with a bunch of other homeschoolers and unschoolers (I don't get it either), and one kid who was about 16 at the time began making 9-11 jokes while the volunteer teacher talked. She asked him to stop, seeming as no one else could hear her speak and because she helped to pull bodies out of the rubble, but the ****** just kept talking without even looking at her. He also had never heard of Newton and only knew how to write based on how words sounded. He wasn't unusual in his level of maturity or literacy either.   
   
TL;DR **** unschooling.
My parents, being hippies, decided I should try homeschooling for one year. While doing so, I met a lot of people who did homeschooling and a lot of people who did "unschooling" where they were allowed complete control of their own education. One of the biggest things I noticed was that there was a huge disparity in maturity between them. While in public and private schools, you'll get your ass handed to you should you step too far out of line, creating a small standard deviation from an average level of maturity, the homeschoolers and unschoolers were all over the place, depending mostly on how involved their mothers were in their education.

For example, I was taking a physics class with a bunch of other homeschoolers and unschoolers (I don't get it either), and one kid who was about 16 at the time began making 9-11 jokes while the volunteer teacher talked. She asked him to stop, seeming as no one else could hear her speak and because she helped to pull bodies out of the rubble, but the ****** just kept talking without even looking at her. He also had never heard of Newton and only knew how to write based on how words sounded. He wasn't unusual in his level of maturity or literacy either.

TL;DR **** unschooling.
User avatar #45 to #44 - givememoarpony
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
most people that 'unschool' their kids do it in naiveté and ignorance.
User avatar #46 to #45 - DidYou
Reply +10 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
Oh, most definitely. The parents were the worst of the bunch, really. They had this delusion that their children were geniuses and angels and that nothing they could possibly do was wrong, but rather a "learning experience". One dad gave his daughter some shrooms (and by some, I mean a *******), and then left her so he could also get high. She pissed herself and nearly jumped into a fire so I had to take care of her all night, and then the next day he claimed it was a good "bonding experience" for them.

I do, however, think it works sometimes at schools like these, but isolated cases are so few and far between that it shouldn't be looked to as anything but an absolute last resort.
User avatar #120 to #46 - niggernazi
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
what the ****, isnt it illegal to drug your children with mushrooms?
#150 to #120 - DidYou
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
Yah, not that it mattered to him. The same guy got arrested the next month for trying to sell sketchy ass drugs at a music festival to a police officer, and as soon as he was released, left his laptop in his unlocked car for nine hours in the ghetto. No surprise, it got stolen, and he blamed both incidents "on the system". Couldn't they tell "he was obviously poor?" He was the worst of the bunch, but I still have an abundance of other terrible stories about them.
User avatar #166 to #150 - niggernazi
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
lol what a damn hippie
User avatar #102 to #44 - callmefrosty
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
Me and my brother were homeschooled until he was in 7th grade and I was in 4th, although both of our parents are college teachers, so I feel like we had a bit of an advantage over other kids.
User avatar #127 to #44 - poxopi
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
I'm in the process of being homeschooled now so I can go to school in September, but I'm lucky because I live on an island where no one else is homeschooled and I have my own tutors.
#176 to #44 - anon id: b44fc38a
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
The success or failure of homeschooling is dependent entirely on the competency or incompetency of the parents in question.
#178 to #44 - anon id: d28f8409
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
I was a bit different. I was homeschooled through high school. I had (have, I'm technically still a senior) more friends than I did when I went to school (my friend and I were the geeks of the class). I agree with you on unschooling, too many parents are not disciplined enough to take on the task of educating their children.
#183 to #44 - anon id: db3f2224
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
**anonymous rolled image** I was homeschooled for a year. **** THAT ****. NOBODY IS GOING TO TEACH THIER CHILD. My mom set me on 8 different online courses and this **** was *******
User avatar #126 to #44 - cazabrow
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
I don't know if this was just my school, but every home schooled person I saw when I was in years 11 and 12 were the kids who sat alone, shrunk down around others and I could see they pretty much feared interaction with others people until half way through the year. By that time the only people they associated with were the other home schooled people and it was creepy as **** because if you walked by a bunch of them they'd just stare at you.

I do feel bad for one of them however who happened to be in an exam, wearing a white skirt when her period happened.. eugheugh, I still shudder from the visual imagery.

User avatar #64 to #44 - dsendz
Reply +18 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
AS a child who was homeschooled until the eighth grade. I can tell you how **** it really is. None of the kids really care and everybody gets god grades because their mothers give them good grades. I was lucky and actually came out ahead because I actually was interested in learning.

TL;DR I also think homeschooling is ********
#30 - doctorprofessornv
Reply +33 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
The main problem I see with this is that kids don't generally know what it takes to get a proper education - for that matter kids generally don't know anything until they are taught it, that's kind of the thing about having not experienced life before. Although I agree there should be more opportunity for free thinking in schools, letting kids attend class when they 'feel like it' seems like a recipe for disaster. Even if kids do eventually show interest in attending class, they probably won't show interest in all subjects equally, meaning that they might ignore classes they don't like, thus leaving huge gaps in their knowledge. Then you have the problem of kids who just don't ever start caring, because not all kids care about knowledge, they just want to dick around on the playground. Although there's nothing wrong with 'kids being kids' all kids do need a certain amount of structure and direction, this is what allows us to gain organizational skills and motivation, thus aiding us in growing into responsible adults. Adults have learned their life lessons through trial and error, and it is our job to guide kids in a direction that will allow them to be successful and fulfill their dreams. Sometimes that involves making them do and learn things they may not want to, because part of life is putting up with both the things we like and the things we hate.

TL;DR - kids should be allowed to have fun, but giving them structured schedules is a critical part of ensuring they develop good organizational skills and enabling them to handle the not so fun parts of life.
#49 to #30 - thehornyhagraven
Reply +4 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
I went to this school until 3 years ago. Almost every single one of the students
(excluding the little kids) went to all classes regularly. The fact that there is noone forcing you to join classes makes you want to go to classes. All children want to learn and this school gives them the freedom to do so as they see fit.
#72 to #49 - bann
Reply +5 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
I want proof
#197 to #72 - thehornyhagraven
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
Well I'm not gonna tell you who I am . So apart from that I can't tell you anything that you couldn't find out on the web.
User avatar #128 to #49 - severepwner
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
"All children want to learn"

No they don't. When you were 5 years old did you ask your parents "Mom I want to go to school and go to Kindergarten."

You probably didn't. And in the years before you got into middle school, you probably ******* hated going to school because it was boring as hell.

And what actual ******* learning is done at schools? Some days when I go to school and I go to the parking lot to leave, I try to review what I learned that day, and I realize that I literally gained ******* NOTHING. And this is account on several days.

Not all kids want to learn, and schools aren't magic distributors of knowledge.
#169 to #128 - kiboz
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
Oh, so you never saw a kid go like mommy, mommy, what is x? How does y do x? Why is y like x? And that's the exact problem, school is boring because it's something you have to do. If you don't and you go there because you want to learn something, you will learn something and it'll be fun for you.
User avatar #165 to #128 - cabbagemayhem
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
You just reiterated exactly how the current implementation is flawed, and then drew false conclusions. Stay in school, man (but only because you want to).
#18 - mazyr
Reply +18 123456789123345869
(03/30/2014) [-]
We had a similar system in our country (the Netherlands), the so-called "Iederwijs"-education. Here, children could also decide for themselves what they did all day, which included playing. Surprisingly, that's all they would do! A few of them, which were really interested in learning, ended up with only a minor educational disadvantage (because they were for example interested in math, which meant they fell behind in grammar), but most of them ended up with a huge lag in development (some of them had racked up a deprivation of 3-4 years in the 5-6 years they had attended the school). There were some interviews done with some of the children, and even though they said they really liked it, they were completely incapable of answering even the simplest questions (if I remember correctly there was even a kid aged 10 or 11 which was still illiterate).

I'm not against innovation in education, as I went to quite a free school myself*, but you can't trust children that young to make the right choices and if they make the wrong choices, not only will they be a burden to the rest of society (especially in the more socialist countries), they will also most likely regret it for the rest of their lives.

*At my school they basically said, "these are the things that you're supposed to have finished by the end of the year", after which we could decide when we did them, but they would always check if you didn't fall behind to far on schedule. For me it worked out really well, as I could handle the freedom and felt more at home in this type of education, however, there were also enough children who could not handle it and transferred back to "normal" schools.
User avatar #47 to #18 - nought
Reply -2 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
cool
User avatar #164 to #18 - xxxherfaultxxx
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
I actually went to a school like that a few years ago, but seeing as i didnt start there from a young age i obviously didnt do anything there, which is why i left it. But the kids that were around 9-10 there that had gone to that school since they were 4 actually could talk decent dutch and decent english too. most people there eventually took a regular final exam upon request and most passed. So in my opinion those schools ARE good if you start there from the beginning because everyone helps eachother with learning, but if you go there from an older age after experiencing regular school it probably isn't the best option.
#73 - osirusrising
Reply +13 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
This is how i feel right now, I dropped out of high school and been sitting around for 2 years now. I want go back to school i'm so ******* bored all day.
#83 to #73 - infinitereaper
0 123456789123345869
has deleted their comment [-]
User avatar #76 to #73 - Lintutu
Reply +4 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
then go get your god damn GED
User avatar #108 to #76 - osirusrising
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
April 2, is when i start classes.
User avatar #129 to #108 - garaichu
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
Good luck bro
#43 - adrianooo
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
**adrianooo rolled image** mfw
#54 to #43 - acemcgunner
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
**acemcgunner rolled image** mfw yfw
User avatar #68 to #54 - derein
Reply +11 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
It's a logical conclusion. Cat girls are communism.
User avatar #70 to #68 - acemcgunner
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
yes they can be..
User avatar #14 - insertsfunnyname
Reply +11 123456789123345869
(03/30/2014) [-]
It wouldn't work as they get older though, a lot of teenagers I know already try to miss as many lessons in a certain subject as it is.
User avatar #32 to #14 - deathstare
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
You can't really say that unless you've grown up with them in the Summerhill school. Different environment, different behaviours, so there's no predicting what one group will do based off what another does.
#35 to #32 - anon id: 1cbfdb18
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
I feel this wouldn't work with tougher subjects (or subjects you had to take as pre-reqs (eg I'm pre-med I hate chem but I still have to take gen.chem and organic and I'm not sure I'd be motivated to go to those (but neuro(my major) yeah I'd go to all of those willingly)
#71 to #14 - nosensephenom
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
Because they're taught from a young age that it is better to run away from learning, that school is incredibly long and boring. These kids are taught from a young age that they actually want to learn.
#143 to #71 - anon id: 21fc7816
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
Of course it's boring - compared to tv, games etc, and it always will be. Being smart means recognizing that former is real life and latter is entertainment, and if someone is not smart enough - making that for them by parents, teachers etc.
User avatar #78 to #71 - prepared
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
What? Who the hell ever said to run away from learning?
#104 to #78 - imagebandetector
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
No one (well mostly no one) directly says that, but many of those kids grow up with the mentality that they're either too cool and/or too stupid for school, so they lose the motivation to learn or attend classes. They usually acquire this from the setting and people around them such as family, the friends they hang out with, or the school and educators themselves.
#90 to #78 - nosensephenom
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
"...already try to miss as many lessons as possible"
#154 - tomtomvdp
Reply +9 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
User avatar #34 - LocoJoe
Reply +8 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
This would never work in certain neighborhoods. *******
User avatar #193 to #34 - angelooo
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(03/31/2014) [-]
I go to school in South Central, Los Angeles. You are 100% correct when you say that.